Everything has a frequency

Additional Information

 Electromagnetic Spectrum

Very Low Frequency (VLF)

Very Low Frequency (VLF)

(3kHz - 30kHz)

Dynamic Spectrograph of a VLF "Whistler".

Low Frequency (LF)

Low Frequency (LF)

(30kHz - 300kHz)

STEREO/WAVES (SWAVES) uses radio imaging to study coronal mass ejections.

Medium Frequency (MF)

Medium Frequency (MF)

(300kHz - 3000kHz)

Non-Directional Beacons utilize Medium Frequency radio frequencies to deliver directional information to aircraft. NASA and the FAA are working together to improve non-directional beacon technology.

High Frequency (HF)

High Frequency (HF)

(3MHz - 30MHz)

Also called “short wave” and used for long distance communications; NASA uses HF at test ranges.

Very High Frequency (VHF)

Very High Frequency (VHF)

(30MHz - 300MHz)

NASA utilizes the VHF band by airborne sensors to study the thickness of sea ice.

Ultra High Frequency (UHF)

Ultra High Frequency (UHF)

(300MHz - 3000MHz)

NASA astronauts use UHF systems as backups for their voice communication systems.

NASA also used these frequencies to remotely sense the Earth’s surface (e.g. soil moisture with the SMAP mission) and atmosphere.

Super High Frequency (SHF)

Super High Frequency (SHF)

(3GHz - 30GHz)

Numerous NASA and NOAA missions use these frequencies to probe the Earth’s atmosphere and surface.  The TRMM and GPM missions observe the structure of rain in 3 dimensions.

Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS)

Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS)

S band (2-4 GHz)
Ku-Band (12-18 GHz)
Ka-band (27-40 GHz)

The current configuration consists of nine in-orbit satellites (four first generation, three second generation and two third generation satellites) distributed to provide near continuous information relay service to missions like the International Space Station (ISS).

Extremely High Frequency (EHF)

Extremely High Frequency (EHF)

(30GHz - 300GHz)

Numerous NASA and NOAA missions can use these frequencies to probe the Earth’ surface, although they primarily are used to probe the atmosphere.

Infrared (IR)

Infared (IR)

(.003 - 4 x 10^14 Hz)

The GOES satellites use infrared technology to view and track hurricane paths.

Visible

Visible

(4 - 7.5 x 10^14 Hz)

Terra uses the visible light spectrum to take true color images of the Earth and its features.

Ultraviolet (UV)

Ultraviolet (UV)

(7.5 x 10^14 - 3 x 10^16 Hz)

The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory is studying the sun- from its core to its outer corona to its outer wind.

X-Ray

X-Ray

(3 x 10^16Hz - Upward)

The GOES satellites use an X-ray imager (SXI) to photograph and study the sun.

Gamma Ray/Cosmic Ray

Gamma Ray/Cosmic Ray

SCaN does not use Gamma Rays or Cosmic Rays to study the universe, but it uses X-Rays to study Gamma Rays and Cosmic Rays.

The electromagnetic spectrum is comprised of all frequencies of electromagnetic radiation that propagate energy and travel through space in the form of waves. Longer wavelengths with lower frequencies make up the radio spectrum. Shorter wavelengths with higher frequencies make up the optical spectrum. The portion of the spectrum that we can see is called the visible spectrum, however, NASA utilizes a number of tools that allow us to communicate and create images utilizing almost every single component of the electromagnetic spectrum in one way or another.

› Radio Spectrum
› Optical Spectrum

› Spectrum Summary

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Resonance: Beings of Frequency (FULL DOCUMENTARY) 

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